So Many Currents in Such a Little Puddle

Second-hand stores can often be treasure troves for discerning browsers. Nearly twenty years ago, a “Montana peak” caught the eye of one such buyer. The campaign hat bore the logo of the “The Cadet Store, West Point, N.Y.” Without provenance, it was just a curiosity, at least until recently, when serendipity stepped in. The faint handwritten letters on the sweatband — “Ward, C. S.” — turned out to be Charles Stuart Ward, Class of 1918. That discovery led to a tale of two young Lewiston people who married in haste and regretted at leisure. Taking a twisted path of nearly sixty years, their story began with a murder, required a Presidential pardon, and ended up in the Idaho Supreme Court. Continue Reading

Memories of a Civilian Conservation Corps Camp

Times were pretty tough in Idaho during the Great Depression and jobs weren’t easy to come by. There were no handouts from the government in those days. However, thankfully President Roosevelt threw me a line when I was seventeen years old. I got the lead on the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) from a friend and decided to join up. I was in the CCC from 1938 to 1940 and it was probably the best decision I ever made. Continue Reading

“Reba” Hurn: Spokane’s First Female Lawyer

Rebecca Jane “Reba” Hurn was Spokane’s first female lawyer and Washington’s first female senator. A ceremony dedicating a monument in her honor takes place August 3, 2018 at Greenwood Memorial Terrace in Spokane, WA. Continue Reading

A Taste For Playing With Fire: Gussie Bollinger Loved Not Wisely, But Too Well

Leo Tolstoy began his novel Anna Karenina by saying: “Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.” Gussie Bollinger’s family was a frequent dumpster fire. Gussie loved too often, but not well, indeed, and by the end of her life, she collected a list of names: Carrie Augusta “Gussie” “Jessie” Leachman-Bollinger-Grady-Wellman-Trumbley-Smith-Allen. Continue Reading

A Curious Case of Amnesia: John Olson Disappears Briefly in 1924

At first, it seems like the plot of a Twilight Zone episode: a respectable North Idaho salesman, town marshall, and a married father of six children, goes to Spokane to make a round of sales calls. He plans to be gone for only a few days, but instead goes missing for three months and is found wandering the streets of Seattle by a policeman who used to know him in Spokane. Continue Reading

“Patsy” Clark: The Miner’s Mine-Owner

Is there any character in Spokane history more suited to the nickname “The St. Patrick of Spokane?” That the nickname was never bestowed, notwithstanding, “Patsy” Clark remains one of the most beloved historical figures in our region, and it happens that he was born on March 17 in Ireland. Possibly just as “lucky,” he married the love of his life on March 17 as well, in 1881, at the age of 30. Continue Reading

The Four Galland Brothers: Businessmen of Farmington, Palouse, and Spokane

In the fall of 1891, the Galland brothers sold their Wallace store and began construction of the Galland-Burke brewery in Spokane. The immense structure was located on Broadway Avenue, between Post and Lincoln Streets, overlooking the namesake falls of the city. The articles of incorporation were filed on July 13th, 1891 with capitalization of $100,000. W. S. Norman, Julius Galland, John Burke, George Truax, and Theodore Galland were the principal stockholders. Of the 1,000 shares, two Galland Brothers owned 799 when first incorporated. Two decades later, a series of transactions involving the merger or purchase of the Henco Brewery, the New York Brewery, and the Galland-Burke Brewery resulted the reincorporation on May 1st, 1902, of the Spokane Brewing and Malting Company for one million dollars. Brewing was big business on the frontier. Continue Reading

The Other Charles and Diana: A Love Story

There are other Charles and Dianas in the world, even some we have all heard about, like those in the British Royal Family. But this story is about everyday people, and a loving marriage that stood the test of time. Charles and Diana Vogel met, fell in love, and had three daughters, all born in the month of November in different years. It seems Valentine’s Day was Charles and Diana’s favorite holiday. Continue Reading

Love Stories From the Greatest Generation: Can’t Take My Eyes Off of You

Cindy Hval is a free-lance writer for the Spokesman-Review and her book, “War Bonds: Love Stories From the Greatest Generation,” tells the stories of dozens of couples who met, fell in love, and married during the tumultuous years of World War II. Read Cindy’s chapter about Jack and Fran Rogers, offered here as a Valentine’s Day treat to the readers of Nostalgia. Continue Reading