A Taste For Playing With Fire: Gussie Bollinger Loved Not Wisely, But Too Well

Leo Tolstoy began his novel Anna Karenina by saying: “Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.” Gussie Bollinger’s family was a frequent dumpster fire. Gussie loved too often, but not well, indeed, and by the end of her life, she collected a list of names: Carrie Augusta “Gussie” “Jessie” Leachman-Bollinger-Grady-Wellman-Trumbley-Smith-Allen. Continue Reading

A Curious Case of Amnesia: John Olson Disappears Briefly in 1924

At first, it seems like the plot of a Twilight Zone episode: a respectable North Idaho salesman, town marshall, and a married father of six children, goes to Spokane to make a round of sales calls. He plans to be gone for only a few days, but instead goes missing for three months and is found wandering the streets of Seattle by a policeman who used to know him in Spokane. Continue Reading

“Patsy” Clark: The Miner’s Mine-Owner

Is there any character in Spokane history more suited to the nickname “The St. Patrick of Spokane?” That the nickname was never bestowed, notwithstanding, “Patsy” Clark remains one of the most beloved historical figures in our region, and it happens that he was born on March 17 in Ireland. Possibly just as “lucky,” he married the love of his life on March 17 as well, in 1881, at the age of 30. Continue Reading

The Four Galland Brothers: Businessmen of Farmington, Palouse, and Spokane

In the fall of 1891, the Galland brothers sold their Wallace store and began construction of the Galland-Burke brewery in Spokane. The immense structure was located on Broadway Avenue, between Post and Lincoln Streets, overlooking the namesake falls of the city. The articles of incorporation were filed on July 13th, 1891 with capitalization of $100,000. W. S. Norman, Julius Galland, John Burke, George Truax, and Theodore Galland were the principal stockholders. Of the 1,000 shares, two Galland Brothers owned 799 when first incorporated. Two decades later, a series of transactions involving the merger or purchase of the Henco Brewery, the New York Brewery, and the Galland-Burke Brewery resulted the reincorporation on May 1st, 1902, of the Spokane Brewing and Malting Company for one million dollars. Brewing was big business on the frontier. Continue Reading

The Other Charles and Diana: A Love Story

There are other Charles and Dianas in the world, even some we have all heard about, like those in the British Royal Family. But this story is about everyday people, and a loving marriage that stood the test of time. Charles and Diana Vogel met, fell in love, and had three daughters, all born in the month of November in different years. It seems Valentine’s Day was Charles and Diana’s favorite holiday. Continue Reading

Love Stories From the Greatest Generation: Can’t Take My Eyes Off of You

Cindy Hval is a free-lance writer for the Spokesman-Review and her book, “War Bonds: Love Stories From the Greatest Generation,” tells the stories of dozens of couples who met, fell in love, and married during the tumultuous years of World War II. Read Cindy’s chapter about Jack and Fran Rogers, offered here as a Valentine’s Day treat to the readers of Nostalgia. Continue Reading

A Hellish Truth Seen Too Late

By Steven Branting Those who plot the destruction of others often fall themselves. ~ Phaedrus Above, the Idaho State Insane Asylum, circa 1894. Photo courtesy of Idaho State Hospital South. The October 6, 1883 edition of the Aspen, Colorado Times carried a public letter to Continue Reading

Nostalgia Presents: “Chuck King’s Guide to Spokane History” Episode 4: “Selling Sex in the Silver Valley”

On Episode 4 of the King’s Guide, Chuck King introduces you to Dr. Heather Branstetter, author of the fascinating book, “Selling Sex in the Silver Valley: A Business Doing Pleasure.” What does it mean when a community agrees that “you don’t have to obey the laws, but you Continue Reading

Selling Sex in the Silver Valley: A Business Doing Pleasure

By Heather Branstetter, PhD Above, the Oasis Rooms are on the second floor of the 2-story building on Cedar in Wallace, Idaho. Today, the building is the Oasis Bordello Museum, the second floor is “frozen in time” and available for visitors to tour. Learn more Continue Reading