A Toast to the B. Schade Brewing Company

Bernhardt Schade’s story started over 130 years ago when he was born in Schwanenhof, Königsberg, a district of Prussia. Brewing beer was common in Schade’s family, and beer was part of his cultural heritage. In Spokane, Bernhardt Schade left the New York Brewery in 1902 to start his own brewing legacy, the B. Schade Brewing Co. Schade’s plan was to brew a fine lager and out-produce Spokane Brewing and Malting Co. As soon as Schade’s plans were printed in the Spokesman-Review, the competition had begun, and it continued right up until Prohibition. Continue Reading

“The Charles Marr House” – Episode 14 of the King’s Guide

How did historic preservation pump $43 million into the local economy over the last two years? Chuck King is on the case on episode 14 of the King’s Guide! Chuck visits Megan Kelly Duvall and the Spokane Historic Landmarks office in search of information on the Charles Marr House, and learns a whole lot more. Continue Reading

Good Times at Playland Pier in Coeur d’Alene

In the fall of 1940, Earl Somers and his wife Byrd moved to Coeur d’Alene, Idaho with the idea of operating an amusement park near the Coeur d’Alene City Beach and Park. For years, Earl and Byrd had operated a traveling amusement company based in Pasco, Washington. They were in their mid-forties and were looking for a permanent location. Tired of traveling from city to city and dealing with the problems of setting up, taking down and traveling, Earl was convinced Coeur d’Alene was the perfect place for their amusement business. He began to meet with city officials about the possibility of leasing land near the city park. It took over a year to convince the city fathers this was a good thing for Coeur d’Alene, soon, the iconic Playland Pier would be entertaining families from around the region. Continue Reading

The George Weyerhaeuser Kidnapping of 1935

In May of 1935, when George Weyerhaeuser was nine years old, he was kidnapped. On May 24, George’s school, the Lowell School, let students out a few minutes early for lunch. Normally, George walked, upon lunch-time dismissal, to the seminary where his sister attended classes; the two would be picked up by the family’s chauffeur and driven home. George arrived at the seminary early, decided not to wait for his sister, and began to walk home on his own, taking a shortcut through tennis courts. He never arrived. But a ransom note for $200,000 came to the Weyerhaeuser home that evening. Continue Reading

A Promising New Future: Memories of Tori and Kisaburo Shiosaki

What would urge a young couple to move to a far and distant land? A land where the customs are not only strange but in some instances completely different. A land where they did not speak the language. A land with hostility to those of a different color, and a special hostility at that time to those who were arriving from Asia. A land, in many instances, of harsh climates. But, it was a land where there was hope. Like many other Japanese immigrants, it was their hope that after a few years of hard work, they would be able to accumulate enough so that they could return to Japan with enough means so that they could find a comfortable living. That was certainly the hope of the Shiosaki Family, although they remained in America, and their grandchildren live in Spokane to this day. Continue Reading

The Amazing Captain Paul Webb

Captain Paul Webb came to Spokane in 1895 intending to ride Spokane Falls in a barrel. But before he could amaze the people with his bravery, he made an attempt to ride his barrel down the Rosen log chutes on Lake Coeur d’Alene. Things did not go as planned. Continue Reading

Bob Grandinetti and the Santa Safety Program

Bob Grandinetti worked the Safety Santa Program for over 25 years. Before this program was formalized in the early 1900s, officers would take unclaimed items, such as bicycles in the property room, and distribute them, in secret, to needy children on Christmas Eve after the children had gone to bed. Continue Reading

“Patsy Clark and E.J. Brickell – Giants of Spokane History” – Episode 13 of the King’s Guide

On a special authors profile episode of the King’s Guide, Chuck King visits with John H. Richards and James E. Brickell, authors of new biographies on their great- and great-great-grandfathers, Patsy Clark and E.J. Brickell. For years, Spokane residents ate at Patsy Clark’s restaurant in Browne’s Addition, but how many people knew Patsy was a mining pioneer – and not a woman? And it was once said of E.J. Brickell, the “Lion in the Shadows,” that by his “vim and energy, he brought the city of Spokane to life.” But somehow, with the passing of time, we have forgotten about Spokane’s first millionaire, a man who once owned most of what we know today as Riverfront Park. Continue Reading

Josephine Baker’s Secret Life as a World War II Spy

The 20th-century icon Josephine Baker was so much more than a sex symbol who danced in a skirt made of bananas. Yes, she took Paris by storm in 1925 with her “Savage Dance” – performed in little more than a strategically-placed feather – and went on to increase her fame with the infamous banana skirt which, legend has it, she designed as a joke for her first revue at the Folies-Bergère. Spokane author Sherry Jones’s novel Josephine Baker’s Last Dance goes on sale December 4, 2018 at Auntie’s Books and everywhere. Continue Reading

Dodson’s Jewelers: Spokane’s Oldest Jewelry Store

The sun was bright on June 27, 1887 when George Roley Dodson stepped off the Northern Pacific train onto the dock at the Milwaukee and St. Paul depot in Spokane Falls, Washington Territory. The ride from Decatur, Illinois had taken him across the Rocky Moun­tains and into a world that he would describe as being filled with “unrivaled scenic beauty.” He spent the first day getting used to the gritty taste left in his mouth from the dusty streets of this pioneer outpost. Nonetheless, he was completely enthralled with all of the activity he saw. From the pow­erful falls in the river to compar­ing real estate prices and wages to his hometown Decatur, the twenty-six-year-old jeweler liked what he saw. Continue Reading