“Buy Gum” Wilson: Early Spokane Street Peddler

Alvin L. Wilson was a familiar presence on the northwest corner of Stevens and Riverside in the first two decades of the 1900s. The bearded gentleman in a wheelchair called himself Shoestring Wilson, and was also known as “The Pencil Man.” He normally parked himself in front of the old Eagle Block, kitty-corner from the Paulsen Building. He spent his days making a living by peddling pencils, shoestrings, and collar buttons from a box mounted to the front of his wheelchair. Continue Reading

Memories of a Civilian Conservation Corps Camp

Times were pretty tough in Idaho during the Great Depression and jobs weren’t easy to come by. There were no handouts from the government in those days. However, thankfully President Roosevelt threw me a line when I was seventeen years old. I got the lead on the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) from a friend and decided to join up. I was in the CCC from 1938 to 1940 and it was probably the best decision I ever made. Continue Reading

A Lifetime of Seafair Memories

Seafair has been a part of Joanne Ludwig’s life for as long as she can remember – not only did her mother work for the chair of the hydro races/yacht club, but she also grew up in a neighborhood full of festival superstars, including a member of the Aqua Follies and a Commodore. In 1994, Ludwig was asked to be the Chair of the Seafair Scholarship Program for Women. She served in this role for almost two decades. Continue Reading

An Earlier Time: Memories of the West Central Neighborhood

Robert Scheel remembers growing up in Spokane’s West Central Neighborhood: “Time passed. The solid, middle-class neighborhood, where the doors were never locked, where you could play in the streets and yards until after dark and never worry about crime or leaving your bike or ball glove outside have become history. [My friends from the neighborhood] are all gone now. But they live on in my memories of my childhood, and the memories are so good.” Continue Reading

Lifelong Friends Since 1966

The Joneses and Hertels lived about a block apart on Sutherlin in the Indian Trail neighborhood in north Spokane for several decades, but in the late 1960s, they spent many summers at Newman Lake together. Between summers at the lake, camping trips, spending holidays together, and sharing adventures as teachers in Spokane schools, the two families forged lifelong friendships. Continue Reading

John Reed: Memories of Elegance at The Davenport Hotel

Is there a person more closely linked to Spokane’s famous hotel than John Reed? He journeyed with The Davenport Hotel since 1942, remaining along for the ride for nearly eighty years. In the process, he became an icon of Spokane history and culture. We mourn his passing, and remember him in this article originally printed in our book, “The Davenport Hotel.” Continue Reading

Remembering Mikki McGoldrick

Molly Beck McGoldrick and Carol Capra remember Mikki McGoldrick, who graduated from Lewis and Clark in 1960 and became a Hollywood actress in the 1960s. Mikki went by the stage name, “Mikki Jamison,” and appeared in shows like 77 Sunset Strip, Adam-12, Ozzie and Harriet, The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis, and more. Often inseparable, the three girls spent many summers on nearby lakes, especially Pend Oreille and Coeur d’Alene. Continue Reading

Ranch Hands Remember Waikiki Dairy: Collected Memories of Harold Vannurden and John Dunham

A century ago, the best dairy farm in the Inland Northwest could be found just north of Spokane on the Little Spokane River. The Waikiki Dairy was founded by J.P. Graves, an early Spokane entrepreneur and businessman. Harold Vannurden and his family lived on the dairy grounds for several years in the late 1930s and early 1940s. Harold shared several memories with the readers of Nostalgia Magazine, which were edited together with memories from John Dunham, another ranch hand at the dairy, for this brief sketch of the Waikiki Dairy. Continue Reading