“Patsy Clark and E.J. Brickell – Giants of Spokane History” – Episode 13 of the King’s Guide

On a special authors profile episode of the King’s Guide, Chuck King visits with John H. Richards and James E. Brickell, authors of new biographies on their great- and great-great-grandfathers, Patsy Clark and E.J. Brickell. For years, Spokane residents ate at Patsy Clark’s restaurant in Browne’s Addition, but how many people knew Patsy was a mining pioneer – and not a woman? And it was once said of E.J. Brickell, the “Lion in the Shadows,” that by his “vim and energy, he brought the city of Spokane to life.” But somehow, with the passing of time, we have forgotten about Spokane’s first millionaire, a man who once owned most of what we know today as Riverfront Park. Continue Reading

“Celebrating 100 Years of Armistice Day” – Episode 12 of the King’s Guide

On a special Centennial Veterans Day episode of the King’s Guide, Chuck King takes a look at Spokane’s Lincoln statue, dedicated on November 11, 1930. Episode 12 of the King’s Guide features rare footage from the Swanson Family of the very moment the statue of Lincoln was unveiled in front of a crowd 40,000 strong. Continue Reading

“The Lion in the Shadows: E.J. Brickell of Illinoistown, Truckee, and Spokane Falls”

Although it was strongly proposed at the time of his death, his name today is not attached to any street, park, building or other public feature of the city to which he contributed so much. It is found only in the crevices of history by scholars who look hard enough, and on a cemetery monument sufficiently imposing that the few passersby will wonder who the fellow could have been to have put up such a chunk of stone. The Masonic Grand Lodge of Washington wrote: “…the history of this city can never be written without his name, for he was one of the cornerstones of its prosperity, and was concerned in a number of the most important business enterprises in Spokane and Spokane County.” And yet, no one is a better exemplar of the Latin phrase Sic transit gloria mundi – “Thus passes the glory of the world.” Truly this was a man his city forgot. This man was my great-great-grandfather, Edward James Brickell. With the help of Chuck King, and many others, his story is now no longer buried in archives and newspapers. His story is ready to emerge from the shadows. Continue Reading

The Missing Elk of Greenwood Cemetery

On the newest episode of The King’s Guide, Chuck King pays his respects to the Elks Rest at Greenwood Memorial Terrace in Spokane, WA. Popularly known as the “Thousand Steps,” this cemetery once featured a life-size statue of an elk that stood guard over the resting place of Elks Club members. In the 1980s, the elk statue disappeared, but now, with Chuck’s help the elk will soon return home. Continue Reading

Chuck King’s Guide to Spokane History, Episode 9: “Alvin ‘Buy Gum’ Wilson”

On the newest episode of The King’s Guide, Chuck King celebrates the life of Alvin “Buy Gum” Wilson, a street peddler who inspired the city of Spokane for two decades in the early 1900s. Earlier this summer, with the help of Inland Monument, Fairmount Memorial Association, and Nostalgia Magazine, Chuck King gathered with Jeff Sims and other history lovers to commemorate a new headstone for Buy Gum Wilson at Riverside Memorial Park. Continue Reading

The Monroe Street Granite Retaining Wall

Chuck King, along with Tony and Suzanne Bamonte, explore the hidden history of North Monroe Street’s retaining wall and the history of the Granite Building, which stood for almost four decades at the corner of Washington and Riverside in downtown Spokane. Continue Reading

Chuck King’s Guide to Spokane History, Episode 8: “The Hidden History of the North Monroe Street Retaining Wall”

On the newest episode of The King’s Guide, Chuck King explores the hidden history of North Monroe Street’s retaining wall. You’ve probably seen this wall countless times and never even thought twice about it, but its history traces back before the Great Fire of 1889. History is all around us! Continue Reading

Chuck King’s Guide to Spokane History, Episode 7: “The Beginnings of the Spokane Valley Heritage Museum”

On the newest episode of The King’s Guide, Chuck King hitches a ride with Gary Graupner, in his beautifully restored ’39 Packard, on his way to pick up Jayne Singleton to visit the Spokane Valley Heritage Museum. Along the way, Chuck and Jayne talk about how the old Opportunity Township Hall, near the corner of Sprague and Pines, is the perfect building for the museum, and how the two of them have had the time of their lives preserving local history. Continue Reading

Teaser: “Chuck King’s Guide to Spokane History” Episode 7

We had so much fun working on Episode 7 of Chuck King’s Guide to Spokane History today (Friday, March 30) with Jayne Singleton of the Spokane Valley Heritage Museum and Gary Graupner – who generously donated his time and the use of his 1939 Packard! Watch the teaser here, and then look for the full episode in the next week or so. Continue Reading

Nostalgia Presents: “Chuck King’s Guide to Spokane History” Episode 6: “Early Monroe Street Bridges Done In By Cable Cars”

On Episode 6 of The King’s Guide, Chuck King mosies over the Monroe Street Bridge to tell you all about how the wood and steel bridges on that site were done in by cable cars (and other things) in the 1890s and early 1900s. “Chuck King’s Guide to Spokane History” offers a glimpse of historical landmarks, oddities, and more from the Inland Northwest in a short video every few weeks. Continue Reading