Nostalgia Presents: “Chuck King’s Guide to Spokane History” Episode 6: “Early Monroe Street Bridges Done In By Cable Cars”

On Episode 6 of The King’s Guide, Chuck King mosies over the Monroe Street Bridge to tell you all about how the wood and steel bridges on that site were done in by cable cars (and other things) in the 1890s and early 1900s. “Chuck King’s Guide to Spokane History” offers a glimpse of historical landmarks, oddities, and more from the Inland Northwest in a short video every few weeks. Continue Reading

The Four Galland Brothers: Businessmen of Farmington, Palouse, and Spokane

In the fall of 1891, the Galland brothers sold their Wallace store and began construction of the Galland-Burke brewery in Spokane. The immense structure was located on Broadway Avenue, between Post and Lincoln Streets, overlooking the namesake falls of the city. The articles of incorporation were filed on July 13th, 1891 with capitalization of $100,000. W. S. Norman, Julius Galland, John Burke, George Truax, and Theodore Galland were the principal stockholders. Of the 1,000 shares, two Galland Brothers owned 799 when first incorporated. Two decades later, a series of transactions involving the merger or purchase of the Henco Brewery, the New York Brewery, and the Galland-Burke Brewery resulted the reincorporation on May 1st, 1902, of the Spokane Brewing and Malting Company for one million dollars. Brewing was big business on the frontier. Continue Reading

Fact or Fiction: The Original Gonzaga Mascot was “The Fighting Irish”

By Stephanie Plowman Above, Gonzaga University’s first official live mascot, “Teddy Gonzaga,” a Boston bull terrier who debuted in 1921. Photo courtesy of the Gonzaga University Archives. When the Spokane community hears the name “Spike,” most will recognize him as the costumed bulldog mascot of Continue Reading

The Liberty Park Affair: Ron Sims Comes of Age

By Garrin Hertel “I stand on the shoulders of my parents. They pulled me up, encouraged me, prayed for me, and pushed me. They were my foundation. Their love was constant and without qualification.” ~ Ron Sims Pictured above, James and Lydia Sims, who often Continue Reading

Can’t Help But Wonder Where We’re Bound: Chad Mitchell and Mike Kobluk Remember The Chad Mitchell Trio

By Garrin Hertel Above, from left to right: Chad Mitchell, Joe Fraser, and Mike Kobluk are the Chad Mitchell Trio. Photos courtesy of the Kobluk Family Archives. Find a podcast of the Hot Club of Spokane Show, which aired on KEWU in Spokane, WA with Continue Reading

J.W. McArthur, Pharmacist

By Tom McArthur Pictured above, J.W. McArthur standing at the doorway of his first pharmacy, at the corner of Sprague and Monroe, circa 1890. Today, the Fox Theater stands on this spot. Photo courtesy of the McArthur Family Archives. I smile every time I walk Continue Reading

E. Lee Rae Clark’s Second Chance at Life

By Ed Clark Above, E. Lee Rae Clark and the Bataan Death March, which he survived. Photo of Clark courtesy of the Clark Family Archives, and Bataan Death March photo, Public Domain. Remember Pearl Harbor! What most people don’t remember is December 7, 1941, that Continue Reading

Nostalgia Presents: “Chuck King’s Guide to Spokane History” Episode 2: The Crescent Department Store

“The Crescent is more than a list of addresses and general managers: It is a mural of faces and memories. It is the history of Spokane.” On Episode 2 of the King’s Guide, Chuck King delves into the spirit of The Crescent, and it’s profound Continue Reading

We Did It! The Taylor Sisters are Real-Life Rosie the Riveters from Spokane

The memories of Michael Harrington and Daniel Taylor, recorded and written by Garrin Hertel Above, Peggy, Patty, and Josephine Taylor left Spokane in three cars following the death of their brother in the Solomon Islands. The Taylor Family was on a mission to contribute to Continue Reading